CMTL Advanced Tested / Intel Approved Memory Program
The CMTL Advanced Tested Memory Module Program allows computer memory manufacturers to submit their modules to get Advanced Tested on motherboards from the industryís leading manufacturers. Modules, which pass CMTLís rigorous incoming inspection, and Advanced Tested criteria, are then awarded recognition as a CMTL Advanced Tested Memory Module, and can use the CMTL Advanced Tested Memory seal.

Memory modules that have completed all the testing phases under the CMTL Advanced Tested Memory Module process are known to be compatible with the motherboards on which they were tested, and will be listed as ďAdvanced TestedĒ on the CMTL website and Intel web site if they were tested on Intel motherboards.

 Advanced Tested Modules

CMTL Advanced Tested Memory
Every CMTL Advanced Tested Memory module is put through extensive incoming inspection and Advanced Tested compatibility testing to minimize any incompatibly risks. The Advanced Tested memory process requires the module to be Advanced Tested for compatibility in any one of the available motherboards from multiple motherboard manufacturers using a variety of processors and chipsets to ensure compatibility. Only modules that pass this in-depth set of checks and tests can receive the CMTL Advanced Tested seal of compatibility, this is your guarantee of a quality memory module.

Minimum testing hours required to receive CMTL Advanced Tested Memory Module Certification:
      Desktop Memory Module: 24 hours of testing
  
   NUC Memory Module: 24 hours of testing
    
SBC Memory Module: 24~48 hours of testing    
     Server Memory Module: 48 hours of testing


Requirements for Advanced Tested Memory Certification

Desktop Memory

  1. Module part number and BOM must successfully pass all incoming inspection checks and verification of industry compliance to include form, fit, and function, device configuration, PCB layer count, PCB part ID, DRAM part ID, PLL manufacturer, Rank, CAS latency timing, device speed, and SPD programming.

  2. Each module part number and BOM must complete and pass a minimum of 24 hours of Advanced Tested compatibility testing.

NUC Memory

  1. Module part number and BOM must successfully pass all incoming inspection checks and verification of industry compliance to include form, fit, and function, device configuration, PCB layer count, PCB part ID, DRAM part ID, PLL manufacturer, Rank, CAS latency timing, device speed, and SPD programming.

  2. Each module part number and BOM must complete and pass a minimum of 24 hours of Advanced Tested compatibility testing.

SBC Memory

  1. Module part number and BOM must successfully pass all incoming inspection checks and verification of industry compliance to include form, fit, and function, device configuration, PCB layer count, PCB part ID, DRAM part ID, PLL manufacturer, Rank, CAS latency timing, device speed, and SPD programming.

  2. Each module part number and BOM must complete and pass a minimum of 24 hours of Advanced Tested compatibility testing.

Server Memory

  1. Module part number and BOM must successfully pass all incoming inspection checks and verification of industry compliance to include form, fit, and function, device configuration, PCB layer count, PCB part ID, DRAM part ID, PLL manufacturer, Rank, CAS latency timing, device speed, and SPD programming.

  2. Each module part number and BOM must complete and pass a minimum of 48 hours of Advanced Tested compatibility testing.


Whatís an Advanced Tested Memory Module and how is the test performed?
Each memory module thatís tested in CMTLís Advanced Testing Laboratory goes through extensive physical and environmental testing that includes various combinations of the following tests depending on the module and the motherboard for which they are tested in:

Paper Screening (performed by the manufacturer)
A paper screen is a review of critical timings, electrical characteristics, timing requirements, environmental requirements, and packaging requirements in order to see if the DIMM meets the memory specifications.

Physical dimensions testing
Each memory module that is submitted for testing is meticulously checked and measured to ensure compliance with proper PCB manufacturing standards and practices.

SPD Testing
The SPD contents test ensures the SPD EEPROM is programmed properly and is in compliance with all the current industry standards. The modules must also be fully compatible with the motherboards in which they are tested in and will be checked to ensure proper identification and functionality in the motherboard is made.

Power Cycling Test [AC or DC Cycling]
Power cycle testing involves powering on and off the motherboard platform for 50~100 cycles. This test checks the memory modules ability to be cycled and makes sure the board or system will boot properly an indefinite number of times without errors. This test verifies board or system response to different DIMM sizes, module organization, volatile register, memory caches, RAM, and amount of memory installed on the board.

S0~S5 (suspend to RAM) test
The S0~S5 test is performed to ensure that the memory modules being tested are correctly refreshed by the motherboard and are capable of retaining their contents through a power management state. The motherboard and memory modules interoperability is tested to see that no test data is lost or corrupted during the testing.

  • System Power State S0 the ON state: The system is completely operation, fully powered and completely retains the context.

  • System Power State S1 the Sleep state: The system consumes less power than S0 state. All Hardware & Processor context is maintained.

  • System Power State S2 the Sleep state: The system consumes less power than S1 state. Processor loses power and processor context and contents of the cache are lost.

  • System Power State S3 the Sleep state: The system consumes less power than S2 state. Processor & Hardware context, cache contents, and chipset context are lost. The system memory is retained.

  • System Power State S4 the Hibernate state: The system consumes the least power compared to all other sleep states. The system is almost at an OFF state, expect for a trickle power. The context data is written to hard drive (disk)and there is no context retained.

  • System Power State S5 the OFF state:The system is in a shutdown state and the system retains no context. Note that in power state S4 the system can restart from the context data stored on the disk, but in S5 the system requires a reboot.

Room temperature & nominal voltage functional testing
The room temperature testing involves testing the memory modules on the motherboard while running R.S.T PRO 3 USB or PCI/PCIe Test Card and additional memory stress software under room temperature conditions. Each memory module test cycle typically last 6~24 hours (server platforms only for room temperature testing).

Elevated temperature and voltage margining functional testing
The elevated temperature testing and voltage margining tests involve testing the memory modules on the motherboard for which it is being tested while fluctuating memory power voltages (+/-3~5% depending on the motherboard) to the memory modules under test for extended periods of time during elevated temperatures (35c to 55c). The test involves testing the memory modules and memory sub system on the motherboard while running R.S.T PRO 3 USB or PCI/PCIe Test Card or Intel Proprietary test software and additional memory stress software under these harsh conditions. Each memory module test cycle typically last from 6~24 hours for desktops and 12~48 hours for server platforms.


The value of CMTL Advanced Tested Memory
In order to obtain CMTL Advanced Tested, each memory product is subjected to CMTLís exacting test procedures. This is a guarantee that every Advanced Tested Memory module is compatible with the motherboard for which it was tested, whether thatís a desktop, NUC, SBC, or server. Memory modules which are NOT CMTL Advanced Tested for compatibility and functionality may experience erratic and inconsistent functionality which can negatively affect overall system reliability. This loss of reliability can be the result of issues involving:

  • Module design

  • Component selection

  • SPD programming

  • PCB structural integrity

  • Manufacturing, and quality control processes

The CMTL Advanced Tested Memory testing program can detect these potential problems, providing resellers, manufacturers and consumers the confidence of a CMTL Advanced Tested Memory Module.

 
     

 

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